Living Will

Living Will

A living will is considered to be a legal document which you execute that states which life-prolonging and saving measures you do or do not want. A living will allows you to express your desires in writing to your doctors in case you are not able to communicate them directly. A living will also allows you to plan on whether or not you will want to be on life supoport machines and when to terminate that care in the event of an illness or injury. A living will is usually combined with a health care power of attorney, which allows you to name someone to carry out any health care decisions you have made in the event that you become incapacitated. Together a living will and a health care power of attorney make up an advanced health care directive.


There are a few benefits of a living will that you will want to learn about to help you decide what is best for you and your family. This planning will help ease the strain of a loved one that will be tasked to carry out those decisions for you. One benefit of having a living will in place is medical professionals will know how to care for you if you become incapacitated. A living will makes it easier for the doctors to recommend the right kind of medical treatment according to the patient’s wishes and hopefully will reduce any conflicts amongst your loved ones who might not agree on the type of care that should be given. Another benefit of having a living will in place, is it may give you and your family peace of mind knowing that a living will is in place. It is never easy to talk about this type of crisis’s, however, it is better to know that everything has been discussed and decided by you, before you are incapaciated. Finally, one last benefit of having a living will in place, is that you have maintained a sense of control in your life and you didn’t leave these types of decisions unattended to. A living will leaves you the right to speak of your own preferences whether or not you will be medically able to in the future. A living will allows you to direct your own care up to the final moments and still be able to retain your independence.